Why It May Be Too Early to Throw Away Your Masks

We’re moving through a fuzzy moment in time. Pleased to socialize, but warily looking over our shoulders.

Hunter Biden, Artist or Opportunist?

Hunter Biden, recently announced two upcoming art exhibits of his works on paper and canvas that will be opening September in Los Angeles and October in New York. Or rather I should say his publicist made the announcements to the press  and in no time at all, stories were aired on National Public Radio andContinue reading “Hunter Biden, Artist or Opportunist?”

Writing About Unlikeable Characters: Household Words by Joan Silber

In the quest to find novels that focus on families, loss, and conflict by female Jewish authors, I recently discovered Joan Silber.  In May,  her novel,  Secrets of Happiness,  was reviewed by Joshua Ferris in the New York Times. Ferris refers Silber’s signature style as “the relay narrative” and this intrigued me because I likeContinue reading “Writing About Unlikeable Characters: Household Words by Joan Silber”

Safe or Not? USA Celebrates Independence Day

All ages and sizes, they gathered to watch the first local parade in the state capital since the St. Paddy’s Day festivities of 2020.  They smiled, waved, and hugged. I saw only one person wearing a mask.

Summer in the USA— With or Without a Mask

Everyone wore masks at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Maryland. If you didn’t bring a mask they gave you one before you were allowed to enter. Simple. No decision on mask wearing required.  Other situations require you to use your own judgement. The sign on the door outside the supermarket says, ‘”No masks required ifContinue reading “Summer in the USA— With or Without a Mask”

Remembering My Father Herman Maril

This essay was originally published in Chesapeake Taste Magazine in June 2012 When I was 15 years old, I traveled to Mexico with my parents. It was the first time any of us had visited another country (although my father had served in World War II, he was never shipped overseas). An artist and headContinue reading “Remembering My Father Herman Maril”

The Best Exercise for Health and Serenity

I’ve kept the same routine for many years and it works. It doesn’t matter where I wake— city, forest, beach—the day begins with a walk. Climb a steep mountain. Look down at the sights below, the world in miniature, and your cares will shrink to minor nuisances. The cure for self-pity is within your grasp.Continue reading “The Best Exercise for Health and Serenity”

What Are Those Unidentified Flying Objects?

Is it more comforting to think UFO’s are being piloted by aliens with long slender fingers and tall domed heads than a foreign government or impetuous scientist? Perhaps they’re being operated remotely like drones.

Why We May Not Be Safe

Waiting at what appeared to be the shortest line at the supermarket, I began to wonder what was taking so long. Then I noticed the clerk was confined to a wheelchair and he was wearing thick yellow rubber gloves, the kind I wear for scrubbing pots. He appeared to struggle, just to push the buttonsContinue reading “Why We May Not Be Safe”

Clothes Shopping Post Pandemic

As much as I try to stay grounded and practical, trying to recycle already purchased goods, it is still fun to spend money.

Queries, Literary Agents and the Publishing Game

  Like the young hero going on a quest, I’m about to undertake what  is called in the literary world, “The Hero’s Journey.” It’s scary.

Poetry, Writing, and Mother’s Day

Crammed between art catalogues and magazines on the bookcase in our living room sat a battered clothbound book during my childhood. Titled, The Combined Louis Untermeyer edition of Modern British and Modern American poetry, it belonged to my mother. Her scribbled notes in faint pencil decorated the margins and each time she’d pull it outContinue reading “Poetry, Writing, and Mother’s Day”

How to Plant a Spring Garden When You Really Are Not a Gardener

Spring. Planting time. Knees a little soggy from kneeling in the grass, I’ve been working in the garden.  This morning, my husband and I took a long walk downtown to Annapolis City Dock and then threaded our way through our town’s historic neighborhoods admiring flowers, ferns, trees. We really do live in a beautiful place andContinue reading “How to Plant a Spring Garden When You Really Are Not a Gardener”

The Plague by Albert Camus Teaches Valuable Lessons

 This week in between listening to news clips reporting on the Derek Chauvin trial and the events surrounding the death of Daunte Wright, I’ve been thinking about the difference between action and intent. Millions of us have watched portions of the video showing Chauvin, the police officer, kneeling on George Floyd’s neck. We witnessed theContinue reading “The Plague by Albert Camus Teaches Valuable Lessons”

Easter 2021 Helps Redefine Normal

We’re just on the cusp of returning to the world we left in Spring 2019, only it’s not going to be quite the same world.