US & China Relations Discussed at Annapolis Forum

The air conditioning was turned up high and there were plenty of items to nibble as the audience awaited the commencement of the presentations of Naval Academy History Professor Maochun Yu and Carolyn Bartholomew, Vice-Chairman of the US China Economic and Secuirty Review Commission

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Maochun Yu and Carolyn Bartholomew
Maochun Yu and Carolyn Bartholomew
It was quite a transition to go from standing in line outside the opening Cadillac Ranch at the Annapolis Towne Centre at Parole, to sitting inside the Power House building at Loews Annapolis Hotel and listen to several experts discuss China/US relations. I never did bother to step inside Cadillac Ranch, there were just too many people and too little time. I certainly did not feel like a VIP, which is what they had printed on their reception tickets. Perhaps someone else who was lucky enough to get inside and get fed will give me a report.
The air conditioning was turned up high and there were plenty of items to nibble as the audience awaited the commencement of the presentations of Naval Academy History Professor Maochun Yu and Carolyn Bartholomew, Vice-Chairman of the US China Economic and Secuirty Review Commission. Moderator Richard D’Amato was chairman, himself of the US China Economic Security Review Commission, so the subject was near and dear to his heart.
I’m not going to attempt to entirely summarize the presentations and the Q & A that followed, but I would like to share a few interesting highlights.
I’ve never fully comprehended the extent to which China is an authoritarian government ie the government literally owns and controls just about everything. Since no one in China can purchase property and feel secure that the government can tell them how to manage that property or worst yet seize it for a price dictated by the government, there is no way for the majority of workers to lift themselves up from their cycle of property. One percent of the individuals in China own 41 percent of the wealth in China.
Labor costs are kept artificially low in order to keep the costs of exports low. It’s those cheap prices that have enabled China to dominate the global economy and have helped to turn China into a world power to be reckoned with. Many of our products, including components needed for the construction of weaponry and technology, are being produced in China and it makes me and many others studying the situation frightened.
What can we do? One thing our political leaders can do is send a clear and consistent message of what are our expectations both economically and politically. With our executive branch of government changing every four years, our stance is confusing. There also needs to be better communication between the US businesses that utilize the cheap Chinese labor force in protecting US trade interests and our government leaders and economists in what we will and will not tolerate.
The next Annapolis Forum is entitled “Nukes, Looks and Issues of Nuclear War”. The guest speaker will be former Undersecretary of State for Arms Control and Nonproliferation John Holum. You can join the Annapolis Foum for one year for $35 and get discounts on admission to each event. For more information go to http://annapolisforum.com/reservations

Author: Nadja Maril

Nadja Maril is a communications professional who has over 10 years experience as a magazine editor. A writer and journalist, Maril is the author of several books including: "American Lighting 1840-1940", "Antique Lamp Buyer's Guide", "Me, Molly Midnight; the Artist's Cat", and "Runaway, Molly Midnight; the Artist's Cat". Former Editor-in-Chief of What's Up ? Publishing, in charge of three magazines: "What's Up? Annapolis", "What's Up? Eastern Shore", and "What's Up? Weddings", former Editor of Chesapeake Taste Magazine a regional lifestyle magazine based in Annapolis, and former Lighting Editor of Victorian Homes Magazine, Maril has written hundreds of newspaper and magazines articles on a variety of subjects..

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